Thursday, May 18, 2017

In Case You Missed It: Liberty Planet's Take On ReWriting History

Over 100 years after it was constructed, the City of New Orleans removed a monument to the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis. 
This move came almost two years after the local government made a decision to remove a total of four commemorative monuments located throughout the town. The first removal, of a monument commemorating the Battle of Liberty Place and the Louisiana residents who died there during the Reconstruction Era, was completed in April.
As these monuments begin to come down, questions are raised about the removal of art and artifacts from public settings and the potential rewriting of history. 
While monuments like the Jefferson Davis statue can spark controversy, eliminating them does not solve any underlying issues – it simply covers them up. What happens to these pieces of history that let us know what New Orleans was like in 1891, and in the post-Civil war era? What about the artist who created this piece and pieces like it? Are the struck from our collective consciousness as we pretend they never existed?

More Removals are Scheduled

The dismantling of the Jefferson Davis statue will be followed by the removal of similar pieces, including statues of Confederates P.G.T. Beauregard and Robert E. Lee. In a statement in May, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu issued the following statement:
“These monuments have stood not as historic or educational markers of our legacy of slavery and segregation, but in celebration of it…I believe we must remember all of our history, but we need not revere it. To literally put the Confederacy on a pedestal in some of our most prominent public places is not only an inaccurate reflection of our past, it is an affront to our present, and a bad prescription for our future. We should not be afraid to confront and reconcile our past.”
The removal of this piece was met by opposition and protest from the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Monumental Task Committee, a local based non-profit.
Advocates on both sides of the argument were present, with some shouting “take it down” and others objecting.

Rewriting History

What happens when monuments and symbols of the past are removed or destroyed? Where do they go – and what marks a monument as something to be destroyed or hidden away, and no longer considered a piece of history.
“When will they storm Washington’s Monticello?” Laura Ingraham asked about this issue on Twitter. While plenty of users pointed out the error (Washington is Mount Vernon, Jefferson is Monticello), the question remains.
Another monument located in Maryland remains in limbo; a statue featuring an unnamed Confederate soldier has been encased in a plywood box since 2015. The statue was repeatedly vandalized and the subject of controversy. It’s removal required approval of the Rockville Historic District Commission because of the statue’s historic designation.
Commissioned in 1913 to honor Maryland men who served in the Confederacy during the Civil War by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the 13-ton monument spent two years peeking over the top of a 20-foot-tall plywood box. As of 2017, it is being relocated at the county’s expense to private property in along the nearby Potomac River.
All of this follows the 2016 controversy in Columbia, South Carolina, when local officials removed the Confederate flag from the statehouse. The flag was relocated a few blocks away to the state museum.
Like all other countries and civilizations, United States history is not without its bleak moments. Even the native tribes who inhabited North America before European colonization can recount trouble days of war, slavery, and unspeakable cruelty. But, learning the lessons of history requires us to keep images from these times at the forefront.
Germany is a perfect modern example. Instead of dismantling Auschwitz brick by brick, the Polish government chose to keep the remnants of the death camp open for all to see. Visitors from all over the world frequent the location, and leave with a stern reminder of the dangers of unchecked tyranny. So far, no one on the left has called the Polish racist. 
~ Liberty Planet
Cedar's Take: I doubt most people who drove past these statues and others around the country on a daily basis gave them much thought. The narrow minded few who say a statue of Robert E Lee as a symbol of racism, could find racism and bigotry in a Happy Meal.
Removing the statues of a bygone era is fine, but without them you lose context, like deleting the Chapter of Luke in the Bible, or banning Gone With The Wind because its offensive to African Americans.
So lets erase all symbols of slavery, maybe start with the pyramids in Egypt, after all there is no greater larger promenade of slave labor than the national symbol of Egypt. Better take it off the US Dollar as well. 
Inca and Aztec Indians? Level those historic sites as well, and while we are at it lets erase all those American Indian historic sites, they were the first real immigrant haters who often enslaved the conquered.
How about those historic markers, funded with taxpayer dollars, Orangeburg Massacre, or the recent plaque noting the troubled 30-40s and the oppression of the KKK?
If we are going to erase history because looking back it is unpleasant, maybe we should remove all reference to General Sherman, who by today's standard would be sentenced to death after being convicted of war crimes, as well as his superiors.
Removing a few statues will not rid the country of racism, removing all the statues will not erase history or end racism. The only way to deal with racism it to rise above it, for racism is everywhere,  those who rise above it are champions.    

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Claire Fallon Calls For Chief Chief Hannan To Be Fired Again

From The Local Paper Letters To The Editor:

I warned city not to fight Crystal Eschert

In response to “Jury awards fired city worker $1.5 million” (May 12) and related articles:

The writer is an at-large member of the Charlotte City Council.

When I saw the validity of Crystal Eschert’s complaints, I told City Attorney Bob Hagemann that she was a whistleblower. The “old boy network” went into full mode protecting its own. In subsequent discussions, the city attorney told me the city had a solid case and would prevail. This entire journey has been a travesty with poor judgment by the city attorney and the City Council. The council turned its face away from a powerless person in cowardice. I demand that Fire Department Chief Jon Hannan be terminated. He is a embarrassment to the fire department and this city.

Cedar's Take: I have a lot of respect for Claire Fallon she's a rare gem in a room of potted plants that make up Charlotte City Council.

You don't have to look far to judge her character she's forthright and honest, Jon Hannan is the direct opposite and you need to look far to she his character either. Like the on camera ambush a few years ago where a female reporter presented him with a long list of expenses and over time wages authorized personally by him to care for the unofficial antique fire apparatus collection. Hannan doesn't respect women that much is clear. Apparently he doesn't have a lot of respect for the guys on the truck either judging by his lack of commitment to higher wages and benefits. Of course he did find funding for that glass stairway on fire at CFD Headquarters. And that street goes both ways. 


Let's face it, Charlotte City Counicl's ongoing dealings with the chief has about as much integrity as a Filipino dice game. 

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Crystal Eschert v City of Charlotte Trial Ends As Expected

In an embarrassing verdict for the city of Charlotte, a jury Thursday found the Fire Department retaliated against former fire investigator Crystal Eschert for raising questions about the safety of construction work at a new office building, awarding her 1.5 million in damages.

Case Against Charlotte Fire Goes To The Jury

From the "Local Paper"
After a weeklong trial, former fire investigator Crystal Eschert’s whistleblower lawsuit against the city of Charlotte went to a jury Wednesday evening.
Jurors must decide whether the Charlotte Fire Department overstepped when it fired Eschert in 2014 over a Facebook post the city said was offensive and inflammatory. The city has said that the firing was justified because it could have caused unrest in the community, and that Eschert wasn’t retaliated against for being a whistleblower.
On Aug. 20, 2014, about 10 days after the shooting of Michael Brown set off riots in Ferguson, Mo., Eschert wrote this post on her Facebook page, which was restricted to her Facebook friends:
“White guy shot by police yesterday near Ferguson ... Where is Obama? Where is Holder? Where is Al Sharpton? Where are Trayvon Martin’s parents? Where are all the white guys supporters? So is everyone MAKING it a racial issue? So tired it’s a racial thing. If you are a thug and worthless to society, it’s not race – You’re just a waste no matter what religion, race or sex you are.”
In its closing arguments Wednesday, Sara Lincoln, an attorney for the city, said Eschert’s job as an arson investigator means she should be held to a high standard. She said because fire investigators must sometimes testify in court, a Facebook post using words like “thug” could make it hard for her to do her job.
“What she wrote was a judgment on human life,” Lincoln said her closing statement.
eschert
Jurors began deliberating Wednesday night in former Charlotte fire investigator Crystal Eschert’s lawsuit against the city. She was fired for making what the city said was an offensive Faccebook post.

Eschert’s attorney, Meg Maloney, has said the Facebook post was an excuse for the firing. She said the Fire Department retaliated against Eschert because she complained about the quality of renovations at a new office for arson investigators. Eschert had arranged a tour of the building for City Council member Claire Fallon, and Maloney said that upset Fire Department management.
Maloney cited a number of other social media posts made by firefighters that had racially charged material.
One was a meme that made fun of the names that some black women give to their children. Another showed a photo of Daquan Westbrook, who was shot and killed inside a Northlake Mall store by police in December. The posting showed his corpse lying on the floor, and said he was a “Black Lives Matter Thug.”
None of those employees were terminated.
Maloney said that if Eschert should be held to high standards, so should firefighters.
“Firefighters come into people’s homes,” she said.
Lincoln said one reason that the posts were different is that Eschert made hers soon after the riots in Ferguson, at a time when Charlotte was worried about similar unrest. 
She also said that the person who emailed the posts to city officials and the media wasn’t complaining about the content and didn’t seem offended. That differed from the person who emailed the city about Eschert’s Facebook post. That person, Linda Havery, said the post could cause racial unrest.
“Ferguson wasn’t on fire,” Lincoln said about the other posts.
Maloney contends that Linda Havery is a made-up person, created by someone associated with the Fire Department to retaliate against Eschert. Lincoln said Maloney offered no proof that anyone associated with the city is Linda Havery. She also said the email was sent from a non-city computer.
Lincoln also said that Eschert’s claims there were safety problems at the renovated building on North Graham Street were wrong. She portrayed Eschert was a disgruntled employee who wanted a nicer office – not a legitimate whistleblower.
Jurors were scheduled to deliberate until 7 p.m. Wednesday and then meet again Thursday morning. Eschert is seeking at least $1.5 million in damages.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Crystal Eschert v. City of Charlotte In Case You Missed It

From the local paper:

In a matter of weeks, a Charlotte jury will decide whether Crystal Eschert is a wronged whistleblower or a Facebook troll. 

On Thursday, U.S. District Frank Whitney cleared the way for a jury to hear Eschert’s claims that she was unfairly fired from her investigator’s job with the Charlotte Fire Department for two Facebook posts and in retaliation for her whistleblower complaints about the condition of a department building. 

The case, which is scheduled for trial early next month, features a slew of conflicting issues, legal and otherwise:


In rejecting a City of Charlotte argument that Eschert’s lawsuit should be thrown out, Whitney says those and other questions should be answered by a jury. He ruled that Eschert’s complaint, which alleges First Amendment violations, wrongful discharge, sexual discrimination and other claims, can proceed. 

The legal fight dates back to the fire department’s efforts to control employee posts on social media. In 2013, the department adopted a policy that prohibits “simultaneously” identifying oneself as a department employee while displaying materials that could “potentially be perceived as offensive, including ... material that offends or harasses on the basis of race, sex, religion, color.”

In a matter of weeks, a Charlotte jury will decide whether Crystal Eschert is a wronged whistleblower or a Facebook troll. 

On Thursday, U.S. District Frank Whitney cleared the way for a jury to hear Eschert’s claims that she was unfairly fired from her investigator’s job with the Charlotte Fire Department for two Facebook posts and in retaliation for her whistleblower complaints about the condition of a department building. 

The case, which is scheduled for trial early next month, features a slew of conflicting issues, legal and otherwise:

▪ Eschert’s right of free speech vs. the demands a public job places on personal behavior;

▪  Whether Eschert violated a department social-media policy or was singled out for ignoring the chain of command; 

▪ Whether she rightfully lost her job for making racially insensitive comments or was a victim of political correctness. 

In rejecting a City of Charlotte argument that Eschert’s lawsuit should be thrown out, Whitney says those and other questions should be answered by a jury. He ruled that Eschert’s complaint, which alleges First Amendment violations, wrongful discharge, sexual discrimination and other claims, can proceed. 

The legal fight dates back to the fire department’s efforts to control employee posts on social media. In 2013, the department adopted a policy that prohibits “simultaneously” identifying oneself as a department employee while displaying materials that could “potentially be perceived as offensive, including ... material that offends or harasses on the basis of race, sex, religion, color.”

ADVERTISING

On Aug. 20, 2014, about 10 days after the shooting of Michael Brown set off riots in Ferguson, Mo., Eschert wrote this post on her Facebook page: 

“White guy shot by police yesterday near Ferguson ... Where is Obama? Where is Holder? Where is Al Sharpton? Where are Trayvon Martin’s parents? Where are all the white guys supporters? So is everyone MAKING it a racial issue? So tired it’s a racial thing. If you are a thug and worthless to society, it’s not race – You’re just a waste no matter what religion, race or sex you are.”

A week later, Eschert shared a post on the same page that blamed President Barack Obama for feeding the “racial tension and cultural divide” that had contributed to the deaths of hundreds of police officers since Obama took office. 

Though both posts were made on Eschert’s non-public Facebook page, they were sent to police and fire officials by a person named Linda Havery, who said the posts were stirring controversy in the community and on the Web.

The Observer has not been able to identify a Linda Havery living in the Charlotte area, and Eschert and her attorney believe the emails were either sent by someone in the fire department or some other part of city government. 

Eschert was fired that fall.

She claims the real reason for her termination was her role as a whistleblower in raising questions about the quality of renovations at a new arson unit center on North Graham Street. Eschert did not notify her bosses of her concerns. Instead, she and her father-in-law, Ray Eschert, a politically connected Ballantyne businessman, contacted City Council member Claire Fallon. 

Fallon toured the building with then City Manager Ron Carlee and fire department official – the same day someone created the Linda Havery profile on Facebook, and Eschert made her first post. 

Attorney Sara Lincoln, who is representing the city, told Whitney that no evidence has been produced that ties Havery to the city or proves that the fire department leaders even knew Eschert had complained about the arson building. 

Nor can Eschert argue that the Facebook posts were a pretext for her firing and then claim that her First Amendment rights were violated, Lincoln said.

She told Whitney that Eschert’s comments on Facebook undermined her government responsibilities and were posted “when racial tensions in Charlotte and the United States were running extraordinarily high,” and may have jeopardized her co-workers’ safety.

Eschert’s attorney, Meg Maloney, countered that her client, at the time of her Facebook posts, was her department’s youngest employee who didn’t realize that her post – in particular her use of “thug” – may have been offensive to African Americans “because she’s not an African American. But there is nothing in the post that says she’s not open to understanding.”

In court and in earlier filings, Maloney has argued that Eschert was singled out for firing when other fire department employees, including top managers, received lesser punishment for similar Facebook comments. 

In the end, Whitney decided that Eschert’s claims had enough merit to move forward. He foreshadowed his decision earlier in the hour-long hearing when he interrupted Lincoln while she was arguing that the suit should be dismissed. 

“Do I have to take your word for this or should a jury decide?” he asked. “That’s a lot for me to swallow.”


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article143149419.html#storylink=cpy

In rejecting a City of Charlotte argument that Eschert’s lawsuit should be thrown out, Whitney says those and other questions should be answered by a jury. He ruled that Eschert’s complaint, which alleges First Amendment violations, wrongful discharge, sexual discrimination and other claims, can proceed. 

The legal fight dates back to the fire department’s efforts to control employee posts on social media. In 2013, the department adopted a policy that prohibits “simultaneously” identifying oneself as a department employee while displaying materials that could “potentially be perceived as offensive, including ... material that offends or harasses on the basis of race, sex, religion, color.”


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article143149419.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/politics-government/article143149419.html#storylink=cpy

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Twitter In A Land Filled With Idiots

Sadly the idiots were once reliable local news stations like WCNC


Blame it on millennial interns? Or just stupidity.

But it's not just TV news operations that have become brain dead on Twitter. Once power house print media is also overcome with the stupids.



Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Vietnam Veterans Day

Today, as you may already know, is Vietnam Veterans Day. 

It is an honor to salute all those patriots who served during the Vietnam war. Whether you were stationed in country or not, you are a patriot who deserves to be thanked and remembered. All soldiers serving during the war were part of the Vietnam war no matter their station or MOS. We all had a job to do and we proudly did it. 

God Bless America

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

10 Years Have Passed Since Jeff Shelton and Sean Clark Were Murdered

In case you missed it, WBTV's Molly Grantham honors Officers Shelton and Clark with this special to the local paper:

It’s easy to say – and show – how Charlotte stood strong 10 years ago. 

Two Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officers were ambushed by an insane man at Timber Ridge Apartments. Officers Jeff Shelton, 34, and Sean Clark, 35, never had time to get their guns out of their holsters. 

Both officers died quickly. The killer never spoke a word afterward, including to his attorneys. No motive, they surmised. Just death, for death’s sake, leaving behind two shattered families, a broken police department and a city stunned to a stop.

Shelton and Clark were shot late on March 31, 2007. Days later Charlotte started to stir again with the singular mission of honoring them. There were two funerals. Two days. Both ceremonies held at a mega-church in south Charlotte with room for the thousands who wanted to attend; each burial held afterward, miles away.

As the procession of cars left the church for the grave sites – this happened both afternoons – crowds lined the long route as it moved sadly across the county. Flags were waved. Children saluted. Street corners were filled with people from all walks of life, from Charlotte neighborhoods north, east, west and south. People were eager to wrap their arms around two fractured families and a hurting police department to let them know they were not alone.

TV stations broadcast these images live, but the most important eyes watching belonged to those in the procession, looking out the car windows.

“We have a lot of memories,” Bob Clark, Sean’s dad told me this week, “Feeling support from people is still one of the strongest.”

Would Charlotte respond with such unified strength if, God forbid, this happened again now? I want to think it would. But with riots against the police department this past September still fresh in the mind, it’s a question worth asking.

Another question as we look where we are 10 years later, is posed on behalf of 28-year-old Stephen McMickens, who still lives at Timber Ridge. Ten years ago, he was a teenager staying with his mom in this high-crime area that, generally speaking, didn’t like police. He was the only person who ran toward the white officers to try and help. 

Stephen and I also spoke this week. He is the one who brought up race.

“I never saw their color,” he said. “My thing is, we all know what it’s like to lose somebody. No matter if the person has on a badge or not, when they take it off they’re still a human being.”

Stephen says he only saw two men in need and was – his words – “drawn to them.” 

Would that happen in our current environment? And if Stephen ran to save police today, would you hear the story as a black 18-year-old running to help white men? Or would you hear it as a more simple, life-lesson headline as reported then, about a kid running to help wounded officers? 

“Those officers made a difference,” Stephen said. “They helped a lot of people. I feel like we shouldn’t let their memories go out like that. Officers Clark and Shelton need to be celebrated.”

Stephen’s right. This week, 10 long years later, we should celebrate and remember Sean Clark and Jeff Shelton. But we should also honor them – by living the way we showed we could in the newness of their loss.

Grantham is a news anchor for WBTV News. WBTV will air a a 30-minute program on officers Shelton and Clark on Thursday at 7:30 p.m.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/opinion/op-ed/article141105918.html#storylink=cpy

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Driver's Ed Teacher Fired For Bullying Student Into Standing For The Pledge Of Allegiance

If you ever wondered why the Chicago is a hot mess sandwich here's a in your face story that the Chicago Tribune posted and tagged as a story about "Bulling".

But this news account is far more telling. It gives a very personal look at how stupidity has come to rule public schools. 

A year from now when this student is shot by officers responding to a to a call for service we can look back a point out that he didn't have a grain of respect for authority. Perhaps at the grave side service his mother will here that words "Thanks  Mom". 

A second teacher has been disciplined at Eisenhower High School over a student's refusal to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.

Vince Ziebarth, who has worked in District 218 since 2009, and was a full-time driver's education teacher at the Blue Island school since January 2014, said he was terminated March 16 after being told he made "inappropriate comments" to sophomore Shemar Cooper.

At the beginning of the school year, Cooper and his mother, Kelley Porter Turner said the first teacher tried to coerce him to stand by grabbing him by his arm.

Porter Turner now says that two weeks ago, Ziebarth told her son, "If you want to drive with me, you have to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance."

"I brushed it off and let it go," she said, until Cooper came home from school and said the teacher "wouldn't let it go."

Ziebarth said, "I told him he can make a choice to sit, but as long as you choose to sit, you will not sit in my (drivers ed) vehicle. I did not tell him what to do."

Cooper's other friends drive with the teacher. When a group went out for behind-the-wheel training, Cooper asked if he also could go, his mother said.

The teacher reportedly told her son, "'You know what you have to do if you want to come with me,'" Porter Turner said.

"If my son didn't say anything to me, (the teacher) would have continued — and that's bullying," she said.

"He violated my son's First Amendment rights," she said.

She said she emailed an Eisenhower administrator and asked her to "take care of it."

"She called me two days later and said he was going to be terminated," said Porter Turner, who then contacted the news media.

School officials did "not set an example the first time," she said, saying the first teacher got suspended for trying to force her son out of his chair to stand for the Pledge.

"That first teacher should have been fired. That would send a message that you can't get away with bullying my son," Porter Turner said.

Cooper is a "good kid" who gets "good grades," she said.

"I tell him to stand up for what he believes in," said Porter Turner.

School officials have declined to comment on personnel issues.

Ziebarth told a different story.

He said he had one behind-the-wheel lesson with Cooper in February.

"I didn't want to say anything to him then, with other students in the car," he said.

But when Cooper later asked when they were going out driving again, that is when Ziebarth said he had a private conversation with Cooper about what it means to stand for the Pledge and told the student how he felt.

"I told him I stand to honor the sacrifice and bravery of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. It doesn't mean America is perfect, or that we agree with everything going on," said Ziebarth, whose grandfather was a Marine in World War II, and whose uncle served in Vietnam.

"We had an understanding. He was making a choice, and I was making a choice. His name never appeared on my sign-up sheet again, so I thought it was over," Ziebarth said.

"I thought it was best for everyone. I didn't want my feelings to seep into my instruction unintentionally," he said.

There are seven other drivers ed teachers, and students sign up and choose the teacher they want to ride with because they want students to be comfortable behind the wheel, he said.

After that conversation, Ziebarth said Cooper often "joked" about it with him, smiling and saying, 'Hey, Mr. Z am I going to ride with you today?'

"I would say, 'you know the answer,'" the teacher said. "Shemar was absolutely pushing the issue."

Ziebarth said he had not spoken to Cooper for the past two weeks and added he was surprised to be called to the principal's office March 15.

The next day he said he was told his services were no longer required in the district, without being given a specific reason.

Ziebarth was not under contract and was not a tenured teacher.

"I was given no options. Had the principal told me I had to allow Shemar in my car, I would have," he said.

"The punishment does not fit the crime," he said, noting that the first teacher got a one-day suspension.

An online petition drive to "Get Mr. Z back at Ike" was started by students at change.org, and had over 600 signatures, as of Wednesday morning.

Similar to what occurred after the first incident, Porter Turner's son is being harassed by classmates, who blame him for getting a favorite teacher terminated, she said.

Last September, Porter Turner said she was going to take her son out of Eisenhower because he was being harassed by fellow students and enroll him in an online charter school.

That option did not pan out because the student had to be a Chicago resident or pay tuition, she said. Cooper lives in Merrionette Park.

"I hope my son can get through the next two years and not get harassed," his mother said.


Sunday, February 26, 2017

CIAA Madness Shots Fired Officers Injured

This is a work in progress and is unedited (Cedar has a real job)
Apparently there is a wide ranging quid pro quo with regards to the CIAA
Beyond free tickets for elected officials, look the other way directives from certain CMPD brass and free permits for venue operators. There's a reason the CIAA is the only collegiate tournament still standing post HB2.
Say what you like about the CIAA but it brings in millions of dollars to Charlotte's economy never mind that every year drugs, and gun violence come along for the entire week in support of basketball and honoring thug life. 

Almost comical the local media call it "gun play"
From the local paper:
The city’s role as host of the CIAA tournament took a bruising this weekend, when two violent incidents occurred within six hours and just a couple blocks apart from each other.
In the first, as many as 100 shots were reportedly fired early Saturday evening in uptown along the 600 block of North Caldwell Street.
It happened about 6:30 p.m. near the intersection of North Caldwell Street and 8th Street, which is a part of town filled with residential buildings, including the First Ward Apartments. The timing was just a half hour before the men’s championship game of the CIAA was to start at the nearby Spectrum Center.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article135077249.html#storylink=cpy
Multiple apartment units and vehicles were struck by bullets, officials said in a statement released Sunday morning, but there have been no reports of injuries.
Investigators were canvassing the area Sunday for witnesses. “Several dozen” shell casings have been found at the scene, police said. 
It’s believed the shooting took place in the roadway and did not occur in a nearby apartment complex or any tented events. Some social media posts were saying a “street party” was going on in the area at the time.


The Oasis Tent nearby has been the scene of past stabbings, nearby shootings and dozens of violent altercations. Yet CMPD Officers are apparently under orders to "look the other way" when it comes to patrons of the Oasis Tent. Seems the venue has a connection to CMPD that the main stream media doesn't want to go to the trouble to connect the dots. 

Cedar's Take: Its the over look the small stuff police policy that leads to more serious crimes. When its ok to smoke weed and openly sell drugs in small quantities, being drunk and disorderly, public urination all over looked.
Regarding Saturday evening’s shootout, several national lifestyle websites – including The SourceXXLComplex and BET – reported that one of the targets was a rapper who goes by the stage name Young Dolph. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police declined to say whether he was in fact involved.
Dolph reportedly performed at an unofficial CIAA-related party at Cameo Charlotte nightclub later that night. Attempts to reach his booking agent were unsuccessful.
In a separate incident, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officer and an N.C. Alcohol Law Enforcement officer were hospitalized with minor injuries just after midnight Sunday morning, after being struck by a suspect fleeing the scene of an investigation on North Caldwell and Sixth streets in uptown, CMPD officials said.
Det. Matt Lewis, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department officer and Shelby resident, was hit by a car during an investigation on Sunday in an uptown Charlotte parking lot.
Charlottte-Mecklenburg police are investigating the incident in which Lewis and and an Alcohol Law Enforcement officer were hit. Both officers were taken to Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte with minor injuries. No one else was hurt during the incident.
As of Sunday, Lewis was back home in Shelby, recovering and resting, said his wife, Sally Hamrick Lewis. 
"He called me from the back of the medic truck because he thought it would be better if it was him instead of someone else (to call me)," she said. "His partner and some others kept me updated while my dad drove me up to the hospital. I was just thankful to be able to bring him home." 
Detectives arrested Jerel Manvil Rhoades in the case. He's charged with two counts of assault on a law enforcement officer causing serious injury, two counts of felony hit-and-run, carrying a concealed weapon, DWI, reckless driving and hit-and-run.
The officers were conducting an investigation around 12:07 a.m. at Caldwell and Sixth streets related to contraband found inside a vehicle in the parking lot, according to authorities.
Investigators said Rhoades entered a vehicle and drove away during the investigation, hitting Lewis and an ALE officer in the process. At least one ALE officer fired a shot and Rhoades fled the scene, police said. No shots were fired by CMPD officers.
Officers set up a perimeter and took Rhoades into custody a short distance away at Brevard and Seventh streets.

Jerel Manvil Rhoades

Police have charged Jerel Manvil Rhoades, 37, with two counts of assault on a law enforcement officer causing serious injury, two counts of felony hit and run, carrying a concealed weapon, driving while impaired, reckless driving and hit and run.
Neither incident was related to any official CIAA-sanctioned event going on in uptown Charlotte, police said.
It's that final statement that is just stupid. 
Here's a hint that



Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article135077249.html#storylink=cpy